20 Facts You Should Know About Pediatric Scleroderma

According to the Cleveland Clinic, although scleroderma may be similar in patients of all ages, there are some specific characteristics that are more pronounced in children.

Pediatric scleroderma is divided into systemic and localized diseases, which is further differentiated into subtypes based on clinical findings of skin involvement.
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1. There are two types of pediatric scleroderma: localized scleroderma and systemic scleroderma

2. Localized scleroderma is more common in children, usually only affecting the skin. In some cases, it might spread to the underlying muscles.

3. Children with systemic sclerosis may have more widespread skin changes which may result in limited joint movement.

4. Raynaud’s phenomenon may be present early in a child with systemic sclerosis.

According to the Scleroderma Foundation, while there is no proven cure for scleroderma, much can be done to prevent, minimize or alleviate its effects and symptoms. 

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