Lindsey Shapiro, PhD, science writer —

Lindsey earned her PhD in neuroscience from Emory University in Atlanta, where she studied novel therapeutic strategies for treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy. She was awarded a fellowship from the American Epilepsy Society in 2019 for this research. Lindsey also previously worked as a postdoctoral researcher, studying the role of inflammation in epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease.

Articles by Lindsey Shapiro

Centromere Defects Linked to SSc Autoimmunity

A new study has found that defects in centromeres — specific regions of chromosomes — are evident in skin cells from people with systemic sclerosis (SSc). People with diffuse cutaneous (dcSSc) and limited cutaneous (lcSSc) forms of the disease showed specific alterations relative to healthy people, but chromosomal…

Tobacco Linked To Worsening GI Symptoms, Not Some SSc Medicines

Tobacco use by systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients is linked to worsening gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, but the immunosuppressive and anti-scarring medications used to treat the autoimmune disease aren’t, according to a recent analysis of data from a multicenter, U.S.-based patient registry. The findings are striking in light of previous…

SPAG17 Protein May Protect Against Scarring in SSc, Study Says

People with systemic sclerosis (SSc) have lower-than-normal levels of the SPAG17 protein in their skin cells, which contributes to the excessive scarring that marks the disease, a study suggests. Mice lacking the protein developed signs of scarring, or fibrosis, consistent with that seen in people with SSc, also called scleroderma,…

APT-101 Lowers Fibrosis, Inflammation in Mouse Model

The investigational oral therapy APT-101 was well tolerated and reduced fibrosis, or scarring, in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis (SSc), according to a recent presentation from the therapy’s developer, Apie Therapeutics. Apie is developing APT-101 to treat interstitial lung disease (ILD), a term that encompasses a group…