8 Tips for Exercising When You Have Scleroderma

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Balance your sessions. If any of your joints are painful or uncomfortable a few hours post-workout, make sure your next exercise session is a gentle one.

Slow down when necessary. Enthusiasm is very good (and hard to come by most days) but if you feel out of breath or in more pain than you’re used to, slow down.

Warm up and cool down. This is important, especially if you have scleroderma. Do it slowly and thoroughly so you can reduce your risk of any fitness-related complications.

Know what you’re doing. Don’t do exercises without paying attention to your technique and try to move as smoothly as possible. If you don’t know how to do any part of your workout routine, consult a specialist to prevent injuries.

Know your limits. Understand that if you have conditions other than scleroderma, you might have other limitations as well. For example, if you also suffer from arthritis, you shouldn’t work out with painful or inflamed joints.

Move regularly. Try to include healthier activity in your daily routine. If you can, walk to the shops or work instead of driving.

MOREEffects of exercise on patients with scleroderma

Scleroderma News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.
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Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.
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2 comments

  1. Sandra Stapleton says:

    Hi, I am 73 with many other autoimmune problems but this lower leg and feet/ankle pain with the constant red patches which have even become infected, are just too much to tolerate…
    regards

  2. Lalit Raj says:

    I need advice how to do exercise for leg joints pain.My wife is diagnosed with scleroderma. She is 52 years old. Kindly advise

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