Systemic Sclerosis Disease Activity Seen to Correlate with Vitamin D Deficiency

Systemic Sclerosis Disease Activity Seen to Correlate with Vitamin D Deficiency
0
(0)

A two-year study found that 80 percent of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients had deficient levels of vitamin D when compared to healthy controls, and worse disease symptoms. The results were presented at the 2015 American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting. The abstract, titled Relationship Between Vitamin D Levels and Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis,” is available at the meeting’s website.

Low levels of vitamin D have been increasingly observed in several diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and a range of autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis. The observation has also been established in SSc, although the significance and importance of vitamin D in this disease has not yet been fully assessed.

Researchers evaluated the difference in vitamin D levels between SSc patients and healthy controls, and established a correlation between those levels and disease activity, severity, and other clinical features.

The team analyzed 58 SSc patients and 58 matched controls. The mean value of vitamin D was 19.9 ng/mL in the SSc group, and 29.6 ng/mL in the control group. A total of 29 patients (50%) in the SSc group had vitamin D deficiency, 20 (34.5%) had insufficiency, and 9 (15.5%) presented normal vitamin levels. Among healthy participants, 6 (10.3%) had vitamin D deficiency, 27 (46.6%) insufficiency, and 25 (43.1%) presented normal levels. [Vitamin D levels of 20–29.9 ng/mL were classified as  insufficiency; concentrations lower than 20 ng/mL as deficiency.]

More specifically, of the patients with diffuse SSc (22 patients, 38%), marked by widespread involvement of the skin, 17 (77%) presented deficiency, 4 (18%) insufficiency, and 1 (5%) a normal vitamin D level. Of the 36 patients (62%) with limited disease, 12 (33%) had deficiency, 16 (44%) insufficiency, and 8 (23%) normal levels.

Patients with suboptimal levels of vitamin D had higher disease activity parameters, as measured by the Rodnan Score, S-HAQ, Medsger Score, and EUSTAR Disease Activity Score. Steroid treatment did not affect vitamin D levels, when compared to patients who had not taken prednisone or its equivalent.

Researchers concluded, “Hypovitaminosis D was found in more than 80% of SSc patients with a significant difference compared to healthy controls. They presented more frequently the diffuse form, higher cutaneous involvement, more severe and active disease and higher levels of disability.”

Margarida graduated with a BS in Health Sciences from the University of Lisbon and a MSc in Biotechnology from Instituto Superior Técnico (IST-UL). She worked as a molecular biologist research associate at a Cambridge UK-based biotech company that discovers and develops therapeutic, fully human monoclonal antibodies.
×
Margarida graduated with a BS in Health Sciences from the University of Lisbon and a MSc in Biotechnology from Instituto Superior Técnico (IST-UL). She worked as a molecular biologist research associate at a Cambridge UK-based biotech company that discovers and develops therapeutic, fully human monoclonal antibodies.
Latest Posts
  • Shear-wave Elastography
  • Cytori cell therapy for scleroderma
  • Genetic map of scleroderma
  • annual meetings

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 0 / 5. Vote count: 0

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

As you found this post useful...

Follow us on social media!

We are sorry that this post was not useful for you!

Let us improve this post!

Tell us how we can improve this post?